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Introdução

Replace a broken, cracked or defective display on your Apple Watch.

As a precaution against damaging your device, this guide starts by disconnecting the battery, in the only way you can—by removing it.

  1. We recommend that you clean your microwave before proceeding, as any nasty gunk on the bottom may end up stuck to the iOpener. Place the iOpener in the center of the microwave.
    • We recommend that you clean your microwave before proceeding, as any nasty gunk on the bottom may end up stuck to the iOpener.

    • Place the iOpener in the center of the microwave.

    • For carousel microwaves: Make sure the plate spins freely. If your iOpener gets stuck, it may overheat and burn.

    which temperature must be used for heating? Thx

    fbarletta - Responder

    I found you need to be very patient when using the iOpener. It's worth taking your time, giving the heat time to work on the glue. When I finally got the battery out, there were some strips of glue left behind that I just cleaned off with some isopropanol before installing the new battery.

    By the way, I had to run the iOpener for longer in my microwave for it to get hot enough. When it was too hot to touch, I figured it was hot enough for the batteries.

    Fredrik -

    I didn't find this to be as hard as I had built it up in my mind to be; HOWEVER, saying that I need to say years ago I was the local Nokia service center in my town. But many years ago right after they got rid of analog times. Yeah. A classic installer/repairer mistake when starting something they haven't fixed or installed before is picking up the instructions, flipping through them; maybe even reading a section that is new-then tossing the instructions over the shoulder. "I got this." This usually comes right before something major gets broke. And I can tell you when you try to do it yourself and then mess it up horribly then take it to the repair shop. Well we called that "I can do it myself" syndrome and charged extra to put back together what they brought in in the box. Now knowing all this - I can't stress this enough because I am stupid, stupid, stupid. COVER YOUR SCREEN IN CLEAR BOXING TAPE AND READ ALL THE INSTRUCTION BELOW THROUGH TO THE END BEFORE EVEN ATTEMPTING THIS FIX. Take my advise.

    windizy - Responder

    I didn't have an iOpener, so I used a wheat type heat bag. If you do this though, make sure you put a layer of plastic between your Mac and the bag, or you'll get condensation in places you don't want it.

    Martin Gray - Responder

    I started out using the iOpener but switched to my wife's hairdryer. A heat gun or hair dryer proved to be much more convenient and is a time saviour. You can heat more and the glue becomes more fluid make the next steps with the opening picks much easier

    Jan Van Puymbroeck - Responder

    I know this is obvious, but backup your iPad with iTunes before you start. I'd also turn off your passcode if you have one.

    Laurie Higgins - Responder

    Ther first time you heat up the iOpener for this repair when its room temperature I had to heat it up for more than 30 seconds. I remember I had to heat it up for around 45 seconds. However, after that when you need to reheat it again during the repair 30 seconds will be enough.

    Yousef Ghalib - Responder

    I used the wheat bag in a sensor microwave heating up to 65-70 deg C (155 def F).

    ian cheong - Responder

    Get yourself a cherry pit bean bag the size of your iPad. Heat it, put the iPad on it for 3 to 5 minutes or so, reheat the cherry pit bean bag, again put your iPad on it. Then heat the iOpener and start working. The cherry pit bean bag will have to be reheated several times, but it will soften the adhesive so you have less problems with the iOpener

    Tim Feyaerts - Responder

    The heating can be done very effectively (and quickly) with 3d printer heated bed. Make sure the bed is clean. Set the temperature to 60c, (130f ) and put the ipad face down for +/- 10 minutes. Repeat as needed throughout the “gentle prying” stages.

    polleyphony - Responder

    The iOpener did not work at all for me.

    I had to use a heat gun and bring the edges of the case up to ~200 degrees (used an infrared thermometer to measure) before the glue would weaken. This obviously superheated the metal frame, so I also had to wear gloves to handle the phone while prying the back off with the included picks.

    Mike Jeanette - Responder

    Repair instructions worked like a charm. Had to be patient with the iOpener and getting the screen off. I tried repeatedly without success until shifting the suction cup a bit to the left side where perhaps the glue had loosened up a bit more.

    Kyle - Responder

    The iOpener, in my opinion, is of no help. Many warnings to say “don’t warm it too much”, but the glue doesn’t melt if not warm enough. As a result, a complete waste of time and energy. In addition, too much liquid in it, so it doesn’t lay on the device on a sufficient surface. I took a hairdryer and it worked much much better.

    laurentvidu - Responder

    I used an immersion bath to heat this to 180F and applied it to the device until the outside temperature of the opener read 150F with an IR thermometer. Removing the screen took very little force with this method.

    breadandbits - Responder

    My experience. I was replacing the screen which had been cracked and a little shattered in some places. The iopener is pretty much useless, so was the suction cup. The suction cup would probably be more useful if I was doing something besides the screen. Also you probably want the clean the screen before using it so it can get good suction. I used a hair dryer on high for a couple of minutes at a time (someone on this tread suggested that). I used my exacto knife and a razor blade to get into the adhesive. First the exacto to get the initial cut, then the razor blade to go a little deeper. Could have probably just used the razor blade, but the exacto has a little more finesse. I got the razor blade in and a little under the glass then I used the picks to wedge in. I didn’t want to risk anything using the razor blade too much. Used tape to keep the shattered glass together.

    trebor65 - Responder

    My experience pt2

    Fortunately the shattering was mostly on the edges and most of it had adhesive on the back so it stuck together. Just take your time and work your way around following the guide to get the screen off. Have some goof off or goo be gone to clean the frame when putting the new glass on or putting the existing one back. (someone suggested that also, very good idea). Be careful of the LCD (you should know that). The cable on my LCD was pretty tight, so I propped it up while taking the cable cover off and when I put it back on I did the same thing. I just put a bottle on the battery and leaned the back of the LCD on that while attaching the cables and putting the screws back on the cover. Also be careful with the home button and the bracket on the back of it. I had enough old adhesive on left on the bracket that it stuck back to the new glass fine. So far only 12 hours in, so we will see how that holds up when the kids get at it.

    trebor65 - Responder

    Another alternative if you do not have the iopener is to use a bed time hotwater bottle. Do not over fill it though. Just put enough hot water in to support the phone while you work around the adhesive.

    I use both the hot water bottle and iopener together on Samsung's. It makes life easier

    gazza667 - Responder

    I followed the directions and heated my iOpener for 30 seconds in a 1000 watt microwave, and it came out at 160 degrees F, as verified by a infrared thermometer. This allowed me to separate the last bit of the back of my Samsung S8, which was already coming off due to a swollen battery (hence the reason for the repair).

    Dennis - Responder

    Hallo,habe den Akku erfolgreich getauscht.Doch seitdem gibt es bei Telefonaten eine Rückkopplung für den anrufenden.Bei mir ist alles normal.Woran liegt das?Mfg

    Manu R - Responder

    If you follow these instructions, you will crack your screen like I did. Heating the iOpener for 30 seconds, using it to melt glue, then waiting 10 minutes to reheat is useless. The iOpener can be used to maybe warm the glue on whatever side you aren’t working on. You need a hairdryer and/or a heat gun to melt the glue and separate the glass from the iPad.

    Anyone want to buy an old iPad with broken glass and a dead battery?

    mpulliam - Responder

    Not everybody has a microwave. You should provide a target temperature for the iOpener and instructions for a conventional oven, or pot of warm water, or whatever. Although I will probably use a heat gun …

    Esmond Pitt - Responder

    Three times heating opener and no luck. Tried pressing down gently on opener with a towel, and the opener broke. Wondering if I now replace table mats, fancy table cloth, etc. or will this stuff wash out.

    Not impressed so far. Maybe the hair dryer next.

    doug - Responder

    I support the comments about the iOpener. Everyone has a hair drier, FHS, so get a cheap IR thermometer (£18) and blow heat until the area is 60+ deg C. Still takes w while, and getting the screen off is v scary, but just add more heat if you feel resistance.

    The rest of the kit is good, esp the magnetic screwdrivers.

    Richard O'Brien - Responder

    #### WARNUNG WENN MINIMALSTER SPRUNG IM DISPLAY IST FUNKTIONERT DAS NICHT!!! ######

    Hatte einen winzigen, minimalen Sprung im Display. Ich dachte es könnte gehen, weil der Sprung “abgeschlossen” war. Er hat in einer Ecke ein winzige Glasteil rausgeschnitten. NEIN! Geht nicht. Habe alles mit viel Geduld dem iOpener und einem Föhn erhitzt. Es ist trotzdem sofort über das komplette Display zersprungen…

    T z - Responder

    I’ve started with iOpener but changed very quickly to a heatgun. That was more efficient.

    Mizzoo, s.r.o. - Responder

    I could not get the iOpener hot enough to melt the glue on my ipad 6. I heated for 45 seconds once and it was boiling and it still never worked. Thank goodness contributors mentioned using a hair dryer. Using an 1700w hair dryer on high did the trick to get the screen off. Still took some time and the case got pretty hot but be patient. It took twice as long and a lot more patience to get the battery out.

    Randal Haufler - Responder

    I have an Ipad with touch screen issue, if i replace this part it should be Ok?

    janderson martin - Responder

  2. Heat the iOpener for thirty seconds.
    • Heat the iOpener for thirty seconds.

    • Throughout the repair procedure, as the iOpener cools, reheat it in the microwave for an additional thirty seconds at a time.

    • Be careful not to overheat the iOpener during the repair. Overheating may cause the iOpener to burst.

    • Never touch the iOpener if it appears swollen.

    • If the iOpener is still too hot in the middle to touch, continue using it while waiting for it to cool down some more before reheating. A properly heated iOpener should stay warm for up to 10 minutes.

    I had to heat mine up for more than 30 seconds. After 30 seconds on high it was only warm. It had to keep trying different times and checking it until it got hot. I think the initial time that I put it in for was over a minute.

    whale13 - Responder

    DO NOT USE IN NON ROTATING MICROWAVE! It will pop a hole. I had it in for 45 seconds the first time. It wasn't very hot inside and I saw it started to leak on the paper towel I put under it. Just a fair bit of advice. I think I will just stick with the heat gun. Loud but useful.

    Alex Jackson - Responder

    I heated mine up for 30 seconds, tested, then again for 30 seconds. It felt adequately hot. Leaving it on the left side, per the instruction, for a minute did not loosen the adhesive. I ended up pulling the suction cup hard enough to shadder the old screen. Moral of the story, I don't think it gets hot enough safely to have an affect.

    Travis Dixon - Responder

    There is a clear problem here with the heating part using the iopener things....no details are given. Whoever is testing them needs to make it clear - What temperature does it need to be? And for which phone models, because they differ in what's needed. It's only £10-15 for a laser guided temp sensor unit, and the designers/repairers should have one of those already for doing these kinds of repairs. Explaining half a repair, is worse than not explaining at all :-(

    assortedrubbish - Responder

    All phones/devices differ it’s unrealistic and unsafe to put a exact time/temperature needed to soften the adhesive. It’s really quite simple you warm the device evenly and in a controlled manner just enough to enable pry tools and picks to begin separating. Best tool in my opinion but again this is because I have experience is a hot plate and heat gun both of which are used at nearly the lowest settings and I can handle flat palming the plate for almost 10 seconds I leave the device to conduct heat until approx it’s about 110 at most 120 ish this will be plenty to soften all the adhesive if any problem areas I use heat gun while prying. Again you need go slowly and learn with a throw away phone

    Greg Latta -

    I used a hot water bottle, works well as it covers the whole screen and stays hot for longer.

    dave - Responder

    If I may suggest include your microwave wattage so people can get an idea on time for there own

    Patrick Storey - Responder

    I ended up using a hair dryer. That iOpener thing took forever.

    mark fitzgerald - Responder

    30 seconds sure isn’t cutting it… 45 didn’t get the screen of my iPad air 2 to budge either… even after resting on the ipad for 4 minutes.

    60 seconds in the microwave, the iOpener burst.

    I’ll get a new one and try once more with heating it 45 seconds and repeat that for 30 minutes like others have said here. If that doesn’t work it’ll have to be the heat gun.

    K

    Karl Marble - Responder

    I can’t recommend the microwave. If the the iOpener becomes too hot, it bursts. Better put the opener in cooking water. Dry it and use it. Instead of an iOpener you can use hot/cool packs as well.

    Bernhard Keim - Responder

    Great idea with using the heat packs. I will try that next time. Thank you

    Collins -

    Trust the directions! I forgot and left it in the Microwave too long and after 1 minute I had Mt Vesuvius - the iOpener burst and spewed the goodies out. The problem is, the Digitizer can be damaged by a hot air gun, so I had to tough out and remove the glue the hard way. I made it … with lots of patience! Tough lesson.

    Larry Bennett - Responder

    I also used a hairdryer. I used it on the low setting and I cut a piece of carboard to protect the rest of the screen. The iFixit tool and method is vert tedious and very time consuming in comparison. With the hairdryer method you can literally have the display apart in a few minutes. Using your other hand nearby the area you are heating it should be very hot but not enough to burn your hand. You only have to heat metal part of case near glass edge. If you have a cellular model then you need to be very careful because the black antenna area is plastic. So less heat and work your way up in adding heat just enough to separate around the area but not so much you melt the plastic!

    Fixrights - Responder

    iOpener was the worst part of the kit. Followed directions for :30 in microwave and took 4 trips to the microwave to loosen adhesive on left side of home button. I thought I was figuring it out and it was working well… even set a timer to wait 10 minutes between heating it up. Was on the right side and was on my 12th heat up when it exploded in the microwave. My only tip is that if you set it clear side up, as soon as you see any bubbles or boiling in the liquid, STOP! If you put a pot holder over the iOpener and press slightly to make good surface contact, that seemed to help. I finished heating with a “Corn Sack” that held heat better than the provided iOpener.

    digital_only - Responder

    Mon iopener n'a pas tenu une réparation. Je ne vous conseille pas ce produit

    Berard Romain - Responder

    Bonjour,

    Nous sommes désolés que votre réparation ne se soit pas déroulée comme prévu. Il se peut que le produit était défectueux. Veuillez contacter notre service client support@ifixit.com (boutique américaine) ou eustore@ifixit.com (boutique européenne) en décrivant ce qui s’est passé.

    Claire Miesch -

    Readers looking for temperature advice might check the comments of the previous instruction, as there are more there. I used an immersion bath to heat this to 180F and applied it to the device until the outside temperature of the opener read 150F with an IR thermometer. Removing the screen took very little force with this method.

    breadandbits - Responder

    Thank you for posting some actual temperatures. I have a heat gun with a very fine self-temperature regulation setting capability.

    I will set it for 150-180 F, and use that to soften the adhesive.

    G Trieste -

    Get a heat gun.

    alesha adamson - Responder

    I followed the directions and heated my iOpener for 30 seconds in a 1000 watt microwave, and it came out at 160 degrees F, as verified by a infrared thermometer. A second heating about 15 minutes later in the micro and it came out at 190 degrees F. Plenty hot enough to soften the adhesive for removing the back on my S8. Based on the comments above I think people just need to use more patience.

    Dennis - Responder

    I used various time settings. It got very hot. It would soften the glue but not a whole lot. If my screen had been intact and I was replacing something that was not a digitizer, it may have worked. A broken screen makes the process significantly more difficult. I ended up breaking the home button cable. Good bye TouchID…

    cvela90 - Responder

    After reading previous comments I didn't even use the i-opener. Used the heatgun ( hairdryer ) which works great for me. Maybe I was lucky as this is my first attempt at replacing a cellphone battery. Motoz 3

    Collins - Responder

  3. Remove the iOpener from the microwave, holding it by one of the two flat ends to avoid the hot center.
    • Remove the iOpener from the microwave, holding it by one of the two flat ends to avoid the hot center.

    • The iOpener will be very hot, so be careful when handling it. Use an oven mitt if necessary.

    I did this repair. I used a hair dryer, I think it works better: gets very hot fast.

    Cobus de Beer - Responder

    Readers looking for temperature advice might check the comments of the previous instruction, as there are more there. I used an immersion bath to heat this to 180F and applied it to the device until the outside temperature of the opener read 150F with an IR thermometer. Removing the screen took very little force with this method. I don’t know how much microwaves vary in heating consistency with these pads, but knowing how inconsistent the temperature of a bowl of plain rice gets in my microwave, I wasn’t interested in even trying to use it for this.

    breadandbits - Responder

    I used an electric griddle set to the lowest setting. It seemed to work very well.

    John - Responder

    I vote for the hair dryer. The other methods work too but if you aren’t having any luck, switch to the hair dryer. While holding the iPad in my hand, I found that I am aiming the dryer at my finger at the same time and it gauges how hot it is. I stop when my finger can’t take it - maybe five seconds up close. Repeat as needed like I did.

    Robin - Responder

    This thing melts when placed up side down in the microwave…

    Mark - Responder

  4. If you don't have a microwave, follow this step to heat your iOpener in boiling water. Fill a pot or pan with enough water to fully submerge an iOpener.
    • If you don't have a microwave, follow this step to heat your iOpener in boiling water.

    • Fill a pot or pan with enough water to fully submerge an iOpener.

    • Heat the water to a boil. Turn off the heat.

    • Place an iOpener into the hot water for 2-3 minutes. Make sure the iOpener is fully submerged in the water.

    • Use tongs to extract the heated iOpener from the hot water.

    • Thoroughly dry the iOpener with a towel.

    • The iOpener will be very hot, so be careful to hold it only by the end tabs.

    • Your iOpener is ready for use! If you need to reheat the iOpener, heat the water to a boil, turn off the heat, and place the iOpener in the water for 2-3 minutes.

  5. Before starting repairs, take your watch off the charger and power it down. If your touchscreen is broken and prevents powering off the watch, use this alternate method to power it down.
  6. Prepare an iOpener (or grab a hair dryer or heat gun) and heat the face of the watch until it's slightly too hot to touch.
    • Prepare an iOpener (or grab a hair dryer or heat gun) and heat the face of the watch until it's slightly too hot to touch.

    • Leave the iOpener on the watch for at least a minute to fully heat the screen and soften the adhesive holding it to the case.

    • You may need to reheat the iOpener, or move it around on the screen as sections cool, to heat the screen enough to pry it off.

    Save yourself some time—use a hair dryer. After multiple efforts with the iOpener, I could not get the screen to pop enough to pry it up. That’s when I grabbed a hair dryer and had it off within minutes.

    Patrick - Responder

    • Because the gap between the screen and watch body is so thin, a sharp blade is required to separate the two. Read the following warnings carefully before proceeding.

    • Protect your fingers by keeping them completely clear of the knife. If in doubt, protect your free hand with a heavy glove, such as a leather shop glove or gardening glove.

    • Be careful not to apply too much pressure, as this might cause the knife to slip and cut you, or damage the watch.

    • Wear eye protection. The knife or glass may break, sending pieces flying.

    In my instance, the problem started with the face/screen popping off because the battery swelled. So I didn’t need to heat the face and pry it off. I did heat it a bit in order to warm the residue adhesive on the edge of the face and the case frame and found it easier to scrap it off gently with the craft blade that came with the $39.21 battery replacement kit. If this is your issue, you can skip the prying up steps.

    jeb605 - Responder

    Same situation as jeb605 - my watch battery swelled and popped the screen off. Fortunately the force touch sensor did not debond from the watch. Thinking about just cleaning the back side of the screen and applying new adhesive. I used an alternate kit that did not come with the force touch sensor.

    Tom Karches - Responder

  7. Using a curved blade minimizes the chance of scratching the case or cracking the glass. Only pry with the curved section of the blade, and not the tip or flat section. Place the curved section of the blade in the gap between the glass and case on the lower edge of the watch face, and press firmly straight down into the gap. Be very careful to maintain complete control over the knife—once the gap opens, if you're pressing too hard on the knife it may slip in and cut the battery.
    • Using a curved blade minimizes the chance of scratching the case or cracking the glass. Only pry with the curved section of the blade, and not the tip or flat section.

    • Place the curved section of the blade in the gap between the glass and case on the lower edge of the watch face, and press firmly straight down into the gap.

    • Be very careful to maintain complete control over the knife—once the gap opens, if you're pressing too hard on the knife it may slip in and cut the battery.

    • This should wedge the gap open and cause the glass to lift slightly up from the case.

    • When the glass has lifted, gently rotate the knife down, opening the gap more by pushing the glass up.

    It is not possible to separate the screen from the casing? I have heated this thing numerous times and the opening is way too small to get any type of blade, knife or other tool in between. Any suggestions???

    Paul - Responder

    Using a curved blade like the guide recommends, angle the blade straight down between the glass and the edge of the frame, mid-way along the bottom edge of the case. The metal of the case will flex *just a little bit*, allowing you to slowly rotate the blade so the cutting edge is now pointing towards the center of the watch instead of down towards your work surface. You may need to rock the blade back and forth, sort of massaging the curve into the seam between the glass and the metal before it works. And like they mention above, lots of heat. I used the heatpack they sell, put it in my toaster oven on 200. I started at 130, and went up in 20 degree increments until it worked.

    Pete -

    I've tried everything, heating it up until it's too hot to touch, pressing the knife in the gap straight down, at an angle, nothing seems to work. I've tried using all my arm strength and it still doesn't even enter the gap. Is the iFixit Jimmy not thin enough for the job?

    Kenneth - Responder

    It’s not. The Jimmy’s a great pry tool, but not a cutting blade and not sharp enough for this particular job. You want a curved razor like the guide suggests.

    Jeff Suovanen -

    Just to emphasise after quite a struggle - the blade absolutely matters!! I tried about 5 and almost gave up before the last one lifted the glass quite easily. Obviously, you want a thin blade! No, thinner than that!

    Mark Moore - Responder

    Plenty of heat helps this part. Also PLEASE PLEASE wear a glove. Nearly lost a finger thinking I was careful enough…

    jake - Responder

    Apple Watch Ceramic Series 3… Unable to crack open even with curved razor. The tolerances are extremely tight. Does anyone have any tips? Being ceramic, there is no flex at all.

    kurt - Responder

    I got hung up on this step for over an hour. The key for me was to keep the watch straps on! I initially took them off thinking it would be easier to work with the watch, but I guess just the little pressure I placed on the glass while trying to hold the watch and use the blade was enough to keep it in place. At first I thought I didn’t use enough heat and ended up reheating the iOpener a few times and applying it to the watch over the course of an hour. I put the top strap on, put it back flat on the table and held the watch secure with just the strap. I gave it another go with the blade and the screen instantly popped off. Also, be careful with the force you use on the blade… it seems with adequate heat, you don’t need to use that much (I ended up cutting through the Force Touch sensor and punctured the battery).

    phchang - Responder

    I would never use a knife like this to remove the screen. It’s way to wide to get in between the glass and body, without potentially breaking the glass. I use the Ultra Thin iFlex Opening Tool, sold by IFIXIT. Seriously. You won’t wanna use a fat blade like that after you take the iFlex for a test drive.

    Donald Fournier - Responder

    I used the rounded blade provided by iFixIt themselves as part of the Series 1 battery replacement kit and even that was wide enough that it scratched my case while trying to pry the screen up. Also I had to heat the iOpener like 3 or 4 times consecutively at 30s each and leave it on the screen for 5+ minutes before the screen would even budge. Heating for 30 sec and leaving on the screen for 1 minute was not even close to enough.

    Happily After Ever - Responder

  8. Once you've opened the gap enough, insert the tip of an opening pick under the glass. Slide the pick along the bottom edge to separate adhesive holding the screen to the case. Be careful not to insert the opening pick too far. Only about 1/8" ( about 3 mm) is necessary, any deeper and you may damage cables.
    • Once you've opened the gap enough, insert the tip of an opening pick under the glass.

    • Slide the pick along the bottom edge to separate adhesive holding the screen to the case.

    • Be careful not to insert the opening pick too far. Only about 1/8" ( about 3 mm) is necessary, any deeper and you may damage cables.

  9. Roll the opening pick up the side of the button side of the watch, gently pushing in to separate the adhesive and widening the gap as you go. Remember not to push the pick in too far—it's easier to avoid this by rolling the pick, rather than dragging a tip along. Remember not to push the pick in too far—it's easier to avoid this by rolling the pick, rather than dragging a tip along.
    • Roll the opening pick up the side of the button side of the watch, gently pushing in to separate the adhesive and widening the gap as you go.

    • Remember not to push the pick in too far—it's easier to avoid this by rolling the pick, rather than dragging a tip along.

  10. Work the pick around the top right corner, and roll it along the top edge of the screen. Work the pick around the top right corner, and roll it along the top edge of the screen. Work the pick around the top right corner, and roll it along the top edge of the screen.
    • Work the pick around the top right corner, and roll it along the top edge of the screen.

  11. Continue working the pick around the perimeter of the screen, rolling down along the left side to cut the last of the adhesive. Leave the pick in place to keep the adhesive from resealing the screen in place. Leave the pick in place to keep the adhesive from resealing the screen in place.
    • Continue working the pick around the perimeter of the screen, rolling down along the left side to cut the last of the adhesive.

    • Leave the pick in place to keep the adhesive from resealing the screen in place.

  12. While holding the first pick in place, use a second to check that all of the adhesive is separated around the entire perimeter of the screen. While holding the first pick in place, use a second to check that all of the adhesive is separated around the entire perimeter of the screen. While holding the first pick in place, use a second to check that all of the adhesive is separated around the entire perimeter of the screen.
    • While holding the first pick in place, use a second to check that all of the adhesive is separated around the entire perimeter of the screen.

  13. There are two cables connecting the screen to the inside of the watch, near the top left corner. Be careful when prying or you may damage these cables. Pry slightly up on the right side of the screen, to free it from any remaining adhesive. Pry up on the left to free it as well—but do not attempt to remove the screen as it is still held in place by two cables.
    • There are two cables connecting the screen to the inside of the watch, near the top left corner. Be careful when prying or you may damage these cables.

    • Pry slightly up on the right side of the screen, to free it from any remaining adhesive.

    • Pry up on the left to free it as well—but do not attempt to remove the screen as it is still held in place by two cables.

  14. If you can see the top layer of your Force Touch sensor among the display adhesive, it means the two layers of the sensor separated and you're going to need to replace or repair it. iFixit screen and battery repair kits come with a replacement Force Touch sensor, so if you got one of those, don't fret. The top layer of the sensor may be adhered to the back of the screen—if so, push it back down and separate it.
    • If you can see the top layer of your Force Touch sensor among the display adhesive, it means the two layers of the sensor separated and you're going to need to replace or repair it.

    • iFixit screen and battery repair kits come with a replacement Force Touch sensor, so if you got one of those, don't fret.

    • The top layer of the sensor may be adhered to the back of the screen—if so, push it back down and separate it.

    Hi, thanks for the guide, nice work. I miss a picture of the natural opening of the screen, as the mentioned “Force Touch sensor slides” gets connected from the screen to the main body of the watch by a pair of very thin wires. None of these wires are seen in any of the pictures among this guide, which may lead novices to not pay enough attention to them, broke them accidentally, or not knowing what are them for. Picture on step 13 is absolutely impossible without removing the slides / thin wires of the force touch sensor in advance.

    Cheers

    Javier Enrique Díaz - Responder

  15. Lift the screen up and shift it to the left, minding the display data and digitizer cables. Lift the screen up and shift it to the left, minding the display data and digitizer cables. Lift the screen up and shift it to the left, minding the display data and digitizer cables.
    • Lift the screen up and shift it to the left, minding the display data and digitizer cables.

    I have 2 other small cables which are missing in your photos. Can you also explain what to do with them? https://drive.google.com/file/d/1_6ngMn9...

    Pavel Guzenko - Responder

    Looks like you forced touch sensor is still attached to the screen and not the body. I’ve got the same issues. I’m going to try to use the plastic tool and heat to gently remove it from the screen and return it down to the body. You can see it in their fix of it… Apple Watch Force Touch Sensor Replacement . Hope this helps.

    Andrew Marjamaa - Responder

    Be VERY careful when moving the display and attached 2 cables. While they are reasonably protected it is easy to over stress these cables, resulting in tearing of the mini ribbon cable attached at the base. Move the screen the absolute minimum required to get to the battery.

    Joe Smith - Responder

  16. Place the watch on an elevated surface, at least 1/2" or 1 cm tall—a small box or the edge of a book will work great. This will allow the screen to hang down vertically and give better access to the battery.
    • Place the watch on an elevated surface, at least 1/2" or 1 cm tall—a small box or the edge of a book will work great. This will allow the screen to hang down vertically and give better access to the battery.

    • Be careful not to bump the screen or strain the cables while you work.

    Your iFixit shipping box is a great size for this

    Joe Smith - Responder

    I would taped the watch to the elevated surface and rotated the surface around as I needed to

    Andy Campbell - Responder

    I could not get the face to swing out of the way as shown for fear of tearing the tab connectors. I let it “hang” as much as it would and had to work with it partly in the way through the entire process

    jeb605 - Responder

  17. Use scissors to cut one of your opening picks to about the width of the battery. Try not to leave any sharp corners. Insert the modified pick between the right side of the battery and the case. Use constant, steady pressure to slowly pry the battery up, separating it from the adhesive securing it to the system board.
    • Use scissors to cut one of your opening picks to about the width of the battery. Try not to leave any sharp corners.

    • Insert the modified pick between the right side of the battery and the case.

    • Use constant, steady pressure to slowly pry the battery up, separating it from the adhesive securing it to the system board.

    • Be careful not to deform or puncture the battery.

    • On the larger (42 mm) models, it's possible to accidentally pry at the system board underneath the battery. Insert the pick only far enough to get underneath the battery, not the system board.

    • If needed, apply a little high concentration isopropyl alcohol (90% or greater) around and under the battery to help weaken the adhesive.

    • Do not attempt to remove the battery as it is still connected.

    I tried removing the battery with the prying tool as instructed, but I think it may have slightly damaged the outer black plastic wrapping of the battery. Does this mean the battery is now damaged and needs to be replaced? Or is that just a cover around the battery and it doesn’t matter? I just don’t want any battery chemicals leaking out. Asking before I stick the screen back on the watch, I’ve done all the rest and it seems fine otherwise.

    Danae - Responder

    Hi Danae, the black plastic is technically just protective, but I would highly recommend replacing the battery. It’s possible there is additional unseen damage, and that plastic helps protect against swelling and normal wear of the battery inside the device.

    Sam Goldheart -

    I had to use the pry tool instead of the pick as the pick was not moving it. Was careful not to damage the battery but found it much easier to get movement and know exactly where I was prying with the pry tool.

    Joey Totherow - Responder

  18. Rotate the battery counterclockwise to expose its connector. Rotate the battery counterclockwise to expose its connector.
    • Rotate the battery counterclockwise to expose its connector.

  19. Hold the battery up and out of the way, to expose the battery cable connector. Use a plastic opening tool, prying against the bottom of the case to separate the battery cable connector from the watch's battery cable. Remove the battery from the watch.
    • Hold the battery up and out of the way, to expose the battery cable connector.

    • Use a plastic opening tool, prying against the bottom of the case to separate the battery cable connector from the watch's battery cable.

    • Remove the battery from the watch.

    • If the battery is visibly dented or deformed, it should be replaced. For best results, replace with a new battery whenever it is removed.

    Why should you remove the battery if you only need to replace the screen?...?

    Douglas Richey - Responder

    Douglas - this iFixit is for Apple Watch Battery Replacement - looks like you need to remove the screen to replace the battery...

    jimvaughn6 - Responder

    You will find that it is a good precautionary measure to disconnect the battery anytime you are repairing or replacing a screen as a short can occur when reconnecting the screen rendering it useless even if you have the unit turned off.

    Bryan Solo - Responder

    Great repair guide! You iFixit guys are awesome. Took me about 2 hours but then I am very careful and I replaced the touch sensor at the same time since I had it open anyway. Make sure you have at least 2, and better 3 adhesive gaskets. You need 2 and, well, it’s easy to mess one up while trying to place it.

    rbolling - Responder

    Will removing the battery reset my icloud info? I have a guy who says he can do this, but i dont want him to run off with my watch after he replaces the battery…

    dreadmusicreview - Responder

    I did not disconnect the battery first. After replacing the screen, it didn’t work. I have to assume I created a short. The watch will still turn on and haptics are evident, but the display doesn’t work. Are there any further repairs to save my watch at this point?

    Scotty Beauchamp - Responder

    Yeah, sounds like you shorted part of the board. If it’s a Series 0 you’re working with, just go get a new one. Not worth fixing.

    Thomas Gehman -

    How do I insert the new battery???

    WebPoppy8 - Responder

    After replacing the battery I tried to turn it on and was presented with the red snake, I let it go for about an hour. When I checked it the red snake was gone, when I tried to turn it on it showed the Apple logo for about 4 seconds then went away. Is this normal, and if not what should I do?

    Donald Goodman - Responder

    I'm having a similar issue, did you manage to resolve it?

    Craig Lyon -

    Did you calibrate the battery? You need to fill it up completely and let it continue to charge for a few hours first.

    Grant Glass -

    Is it possible to place a battery in and charge/start the watch without the screen plugged in? I want to check integrity of the battery. I was thinking to put it on charge in a closed clear plastic container without the new screen on to see if the battery is good. I ‘really’ do not want to wait another 20 days for a battery replacement and the battery has no visual punctures, front looks good and the back where the adhesive is (or were, rather) is deflated and slightly ‘knobby’. I do not know if it is damage or just how it generally looks like or maybe it looks like so because of the old adhesive. It is not inflated or abnormally expanded. Anyone who knows about this? I used a hair dryer directly on the watch opened to loosen up the adhesive, is that a no-no?

    Philip Bromander - Responder

    The battery swelled up and popped off the screen, so went directly to Step 12. Luckily the adhesive below the Force Touch sensor was intact. Was able to complete the fix using the Adhesive Strip after replacing the battery. Works again! Thanks!

    Alex Danci - Responder

    The apple logo keeps flashing on my series 1 watch, tried force restart with crown and side button but it still just keeps on flashing the apple logo, does anyone have any advise? Is the issue with the battery? Do I need to get a new battery? I change the screen as the screen was broken and used the existing battery.

    shafeeqrahaman - Responder

    yes the issue was with battery, swapped with a new battery and booted up fine.

    shafeeqrahaman -

    Having the same issue.good to hear it’s the battery and not me.

    Grant Glass -

    my watch was completely unloaded and stays in power saver mode when I charge. When I load in power saver mode the red light turns green for a few moments then switch back to red and no longer charge. When I remove the battery and put it back on the charger the charge starts again for a while and then stops. Do I need to change the battery? (apple watch serie 4 nike)

    IXO bf - Responder

    Where should I dispose of my old I watch battery?

    oconnor84 - Responder

    I replaced the screen and battery on mine. Now, it will not charge. Everything works fine, except charging. Any ideas why this may be?

    Donald Fournier - Responder

    My series one has two other cables/strings in the bottom left corner. Why do none of the pictures address this?

    thatgreatdeal - Responder

    My watch hasn’t recalibrated with the new battery. Even a couple of weeks later I still get premature low battery - it can take hours for the final 10% to run out after the first 90% only took 9 hours. I left it off the charger for multiple days after installation and yet I could still quickly wake it up by pressing the crown to see the time reported with red numbers, so I don’t think it fully ran out.

    Is there a way to force calibration? A Google search didn’t yield anything useful in the first several pages of results.

    Chris B - Responder

    If you’re lucky (?) the swollen battery will pop the screen right off for you. Anyone know where to get a replacement battery for a Series 0 watch?

    rmann - Responder

    Watching various videos and instructions from others, I found that there’s no need to remove the screen if your goal is to only swap out the battery.

    It’s meant to make it easier to clean off the old glue and install some double-sided adhesive tape but it was far more simpler to loop the tape around the screen with a pair of tweezers than to try to wrangle with the metal bracket securing the display and digitiser cable connectors.

    T-7000 glue can presumably be used in lieu of double-sided adhesive tape but it’s definitely more messier.

    Anyway, I was initially quite annoyed about my battery expanding and popping the screen off but very quickly got over it when I realised it was a simple $20 DIY fix. Guess I got lucky this time..

    osienna - Responder

  20. Fold the screen up and over to the right, to expose the cables underneath. Fold the screen up and over to the right, to expose the cables underneath. Fold the screen up and over to the right, to expose the cables underneath.
    • Fold the screen up and over to the right, to expose the cables underneath.

  21. The display and digitizer cable connectors are secured beneath a small metal bracket that is adhered to the speaker. Use a plastic opening tool to flip the bracket toward the display and up from the speaker. If you simply pry toward the watch band you may tear the cables.
    • The display and digitizer cable connectors are secured beneath a small metal bracket that is adhered to the speaker.

    • Use a plastic opening tool to flip the bracket toward the display and up from the speaker.

    • If you simply pry toward the watch band you may tear the cables.

    I managed to replace the force touch sensor without removing the screen

    Andy Campbell - Responder

    Thanks, Andy. After reading your comment, and as I only needed to replace the battery since nothing was wrong with the screen, I too was able to remove the sensor without detaching the screen.

    jeb605 - Responder

  22. Steady the bracket from the left side using your fingers or tweezers. At the same time, insert a small (1 mm) flathead screwdriver under the tiny tab on the right. Finally, place one finger behind the tab, and pinch the bracket hard between your finger and the screwdriver to detach the cover.
    • Steady the bracket from the left side using your fingers or tweezers.

    • At the same time, insert a small (1 mm) flathead screwdriver under the tiny tab on the right.

    • Finally, place one finger behind the tab, and pinch the bracket hard between your finger and the screwdriver to detach the cover.

    • This releases two slotted tabs that hold the cover to the bracket, and should free the cover.

    • Prying the cover off can be challenging and may take more than one attempt. Be patient, and take care not to pull on the bracket or tear the attached cables.

    Also agree: a little too much pressure and the ribbon cable tears at the point it enters the bracket. Take it SLOW and make sure you have really good light and vision. Orient yourself.

    Dave Varon - Responder

    And this is where things went south for me too. Ended up disconnecting from the rest of the watch and the Taptic Engine. I read through this and watched this portion of Ifixit’s YouTube video no less than 15 times, so confusing they way it’s worded and the pictures didn’t help. Now I’m out of luck and out of $190.

    Timothy Hipps - Responder

    Pas de problèmes me particulier à cette étape. Le fait de pousser très légèrement sur la petite languette qui dépasse a suffit, il n’y a vraiment pas besoin de forcer.

    Raphaël WOLFF - Responder

    If you lift out carefull the whole lit / coverbox of the screen connector between your thumb and your pointing finger.

    Then you can peel the cover easy up with your other pointing finger Nail.

    You can feel the smal clip with your nail and lift easy up.

    It works fine by me without any metal of plastic tool.

    Evert - Responder

    And if you do tear your cable? Do you have a video for replacing this?

    aalao - Responder

    I also tore the cable, I assume that once that happens I’m screwed? I have a battery and force touch sensor if anyone needs one for free let me know!

    Connor Bourque - Responder

    Evert is correct - this can be done with a fingernail and does not need to be hard. Seems much safer.

    sambrightman - Responder

    Evert is correct, using fingernail works.

    Thomas Rossano - Responder

    It is possible to replace the force touch sensor without removing the screen

    Andy Campbell - Responder

    There isn’t really a latch that goes with this. Just use the screwdriver to create a bit of space and it comes right off. I assume where most people go wrong is by pinching the case together as they try to separate it. Also, to reduce your chance of breaking it, There is no need to bring it to the nearly 90 degree angle as depicted and 50-60 degree angle allows it to pop back a bit without damaging anything.

    Jerrod Anderson - Responder

    WATCH OUT! It is possible to slip with the screwdriver and completely bungle the connector that the screen plugs into. This is impossible to recover from unless you have the time and microsoldering skills to replace the cable that the screen plugs into.

    Adam Roach - Responder

    I skipped this part as I found it difficult to do and almost made me damaged the entire cover when I tried inserting the screw driver head to the holes beside side it and prying the side part too. So I stopped trying. Ended up looping the adhesive around the screen careful not to touch the adhesive’s sticky side. (I replaced the adhesive along with the swollen battery. ) It was a success.

    Note: I should have zoomed in the photo and now it makes more sense.

    Edward Cruz - Responder

  23. Grab the cover with your tweezers and slide it toward the top of the watch to free the final slotted tab, and remove the cover. Grab the cover with your tweezers and slide it toward the top of the watch to free the final slotted tab, and remove the cover. Grab the cover with your tweezers and slide it toward the top of the watch to free the final slotted tab, and remove the cover.
    • Grab the cover with your tweezers and slide it toward the top of the watch to free the final slotted tab, and remove the cover.

  24. Carefully pry up to disconnect the display data and digitizer cables. Be careful not to touch any of the exposed pins directly, as your finger oils may impede connectivity.
    • Carefully pry up to disconnect the display data and digitizer cables.

    • Be careful not to touch any of the exposed pins directly, as your finger oils may impede connectivity.

    • Remove the display.

    So how do you get the display off the screen or did I already mess it up cause I just did it

    Jamie Groff - Responder

    Hello guys , appreciate the effort that u guys are doing , have one question though , I own a series 2 watch and I was thinking about changing my screen caz is cracked but I can't find that many lcd for 2 series , and now my question Would a 1 series lcd match my 2series watch? Keep on searching but no answers!!! Many thanks

    cris cri - Responder

    Great repair guide! You iFixit guys are awesome. Took me about 2 hours but then I am very careful and I replaced the touch sensor and the battery at the same time since I had it open anyway. Make sure you have at least 2, and better 3 adhesive gaskets. You need 2 and, well, it’s easy to mess one up while trying to place it.

    rbolling - Responder

    I followed the above instructions and successfully replaced the broken screen, however the new screen won’t pair to my iphone or fully boot up, only goes to a certain point (Pairing stage) and then starts over; any suggestions on what the problem could be?

    Gregg Hardy - Responder

    The display bracket that holds the 2 display connections is the most difficult part of this procedure. (Once you get the display off). A bit clearer explanation would be helpful (or a diagram of where you are actually putting the 1mm flathead and then twisting.

    jeff53 - Responder

    I agree with Jeff53, by far the retention clip bracket was the most nerve racking part on my first attempt. I found that inserting a sharp pointed exacto knife blade between the bracket and metal tops of the screen connectors along the edge that has the smaller clip (closest side to the battery connector) while it was still in a glued down position actually works easier than prying the entire connector up first as done in this guide and then trying to hold it with tweezer while inserting a flat tip screwdriver into that very tiny slit between the bracket and the top of the connectors. Once the excto blade is inserted, just a little twist of the blade pops the retention clip off easily.

    Chad McCollister - Responder

    One other suggestion is to plan on replacing the force touch pressure sensor gasket any time you pry a screen off one of these watches. They are very inexpensive now ($5 range) and easily damaged when prying up the screen or when trying to remove glass shards embedded along the edge of the screen. Replacing the gasket also assures new, fresh adhesive to hold the new screen onto the watch body properly and keeping water resistance intact. If you skip the gasket replacement, plan on a high likelihood of the new screen coming loose and having to take it all back apart again just to replace that $5 adhesive gasket down the road.

    Chad McCollister - Responder

    how do you put the screen back on

    Kristen Meggs - Responder

    hi, after some advice. After replacing the battery and force touch pressure sensor i have no touch control of the screen. i’ve redone the procedure several times and everything looks perfect. but no touch. touch was working before the battery repplacement. i see no tears in the cables and i havent forced anything.

    Kevin Rook - Responder

    Hi Kevin

    I have the same issue. Did you manage to find a solution or reason?

    Thanks

    Begoña Montánchez -

    It is possible to replace the force touch sensor without removing the screen

    Andy Campbell - Responder

Conclusão

Continue from Step 22 of our Force Touch Sensor guide to re-seal your watch and complete your repair.

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5 comentários

I followed all the instructions but needed to look repair videos on YouTube. Everything worked perfectly. The bracket is a bit of a challenge, I just took my time.

Thomas Rossano - Responder

I did replace my display and it works super-fine (thanks to iFixit) but the issue am facing right now is glueing the Display+Force Touch Ring+Body. Am unable to keep hold of display to the body and it keeps removing even after sevseral days of rubber banding and heat treatment.

Suraj Jorwekar - Responder

It wasn’t easy but the guide really helped a lot.

THANK YOU

Dennis Bailey - Responder

Super Anleitung. Die Uhr ist zwischendurch angegangen… Obwohl ich mit den Steckern nicht zimperlich war, funktioniert die Uhr nun wieder perfekt. ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Christian Schickentanz - Responder

The screen does not respond to any touch. Does that mean the screen is broken? Do I need to replace the full screen with a Force Touch sensor? Thank you.

Ian Chan - Responder

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