Introdução

We pulled a couple of strings to acquire the most desirable Android phone today, the HTC Evo 4G!

Check out Wired's video of our HTC Evo 4G disassembly!

Este teardown (desmontagem analítica) não é um guia de reparo. Para reparar seu/sua HTC Evo 4G, use o nosso manual de serviço.

  1. Today is a glorious day in the history of teardowns. We welcome the HTC Evo 4G to grandest stage of them all.
    • Today is a glorious day in the history of teardowns. We welcome the HTC Evo 4G to grandest stage of them all.

    • The Evo 4G's technical highlights include:

      • 1 GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon processor

      • 4.3 inch LCD Display

      • 512 MB RAM

      • Dual cameras (1.3 MP front and 8MP back)

      • HDMI output (requires adapter)

      • Android 2.1

  2. The top of the Evo's smooth-contoured rear case is dominated by an 8 Megapixel camera and its two LED flashes.
    • The top of the Evo's smooth-contoured rear case is dominated by an 8 Megapixel camera and its two LED flashes.

    • A flip-out stand on its bottom edge allows the Evo to sit horizontally for watching videos on the 4.3" behemoth of a display.

    • After a bit of careful prying, the rear case easily pops off the Evo.

    • Holy red innards! Maybe it's because the Republic of China's flag is 3/4 red?

    • Like most reasonable phones, changing the Evo's battery is a snap.

    • The 3.7 V, 1500 mAh rechargeable Li-ion battery weighs in at 31 grams.

      • That's 23% more capacity than an iPhone 3GS, 15% more than a Droid Incredible, and 7% more than a Nexus One.

    • Look out! There's a liquid damage indicator on the battery's top edge.

    • We delve deeper into the Evo 4G by removing six T5 Torx screws and carefully prying off the internal frame with an iPod opening tool.

    • The internal frame is easily removed from the rest of the Evo.

    • It houses the stand, antennas, LED flashes, and speaker.

    • Two small Phillips screws secure the LED flash to the internal frame.

    • The dual LED flash assembly consists of no more than two LEDs soldered to a small interconnect board.

    • A small Phillips screw near the top left corner of the Evo is all that keeps the left side of the logic board snug in its cradle.

    • After disconnecting ribbon cables for the display, digitizer, and front camera, the logic board can be removed from the front half of the Evo.

    • The forward facing 1.3 Megapixel camera lifts right out of its enclosure in the top portion of the Evo 4G.

    • We used an iPod opening tool to separate the glass from the LCD and frame.

    • Removing the glass is not terribly difficult with the Evo 4G. This is great news for those unfortunate enough to drop their shiny phone and crack the glass.

    • Standing out on the board:

      • Several rows of pressure contacts connecting the antennas to the logic board.

      • The vibrator motor for...well...vibrating.

      • 8 Megapixel camera sensor.

      • Battery connector.

    • The other side of the board is about as featureless as it can be.

    • Big players on the board include:

      • A Broadcom BCM4329 integrating Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and FM connectivity to provide speeds up to 50 Mbits/s in 802.11n.

      • Sequans SQ1210 RF combo chip.

      • Qualcomm's QSD8650 Snapdragon processor.

      • Atmel's MXT224 Touchscreen controller.

      • Qualcomm's RTR6500 CDMA2000 transceiver with GPS.

      • Qualcomm's PM7540 power management IC.

    • More fun packages:

      • Samsung KBY00U00VM NAND Flash.

      • Avago's FEM7758 front end module.

      • Texas Instruments TPS65051 6-channel Power Mgmt IC.

      • Triquint TQM613029 CDMA PA-Duplexer Module.

      • Bosch Sensortec BMA150 Digital, triaxial acceleration sensor

    • The fallen remains of what was once an HTC Evo 4G.

    • As always, thank you for choosing iFixit as your number one source for gadget teardowns.

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