Fixing the start button

Pressing the start button on my Breville BOV800XL toaster oven also triggers the convection button, and sometimes the Fahrenheit/Centigrade button, instead of turning on. I have to press the button many times, carefully, before the cycle actually begins.

I suspect the button is flexing the PCB behind the control panel and display.

How do I get the cover off, and how could I fix this?

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Have you been able to fix this? Mine just started doing the same thing

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No, unfortunately.

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I added instructions on how to fix it. Hope it helps!

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I had the same thought. So I too switched the ºF/ºC button for the on/off button. At first it appeared to help, but a few more tests and the problem was back. There must be another part on the circuit board that is out of tolerance...likely a capacitor. High heat can age capacitor more quickly.

I found a work around that helps sometimes. Press and hold the convection button then press the on/off button, and lastly release the convection button.

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2 SECOND Solution! I had this same problem. One day, I was struggling to push the button hard enough to make "contact" to start the toaster when I used the back of a butter knife to depress the button. Barely touching the button, the oven turned on. I couldn't believe it....so I tried it again and again. The metal contact from the knife must create enough of a static charge to easily turn the toaster on/off. I was so happy I could get a lot more life out of this toaster oven without taking in a part!

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Here's where to get parts for it: http://www.ereplacementparts.com/brevill...

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TERRIFIC instructions. Thank you, Chris!

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I had this same problem and fixed it today. Boy was it a pain in the butt!

The issue is with the push button on the "Control PCB". It appears that one of the legs in the switch no longer connects or shorts and it causes it to trigger the "Convection" button instead. The fix is to replace that switch or order a new circuit board. I ended up un-soldering the button used to switch from °F to °C and swapped that switch with the On/Off switch.

Here's how to get to that board (you'll need hands and arms similar to that of an 8-year-old child):

  • Start by flipping the toaster oven over and removing the feet.
    • There are two screws on each foot and another two in the middle
    • The plastic part is slotted and will need to slide back in place when you put it back together. Keep this in mind for the re-assembly portion.
    • After you have the feet off, remove the screws underneath that they were covering up. There is one screw in each corner on the bottom. These are the only screws you should need to remove from the bottom.
  • Remove the back:
    • Look at the back of the toaster oven and remove every screw that's facing the back. There's a lot of them and they're all the same size.
    • Next, slide the back of the toaster oven down by approximately 1/2" and remove it. It's on there pretty tight.
  • Remove the top case from the toaster:
    • When looking from the back, the top and right side are slotted and held in place by tension.
    • Above the control panel and on the left side (same side as the control panel) there are 5 black screws. 3 are on the side and two are along the top. They are not easy to get to. I suggest starting with the one in the bottom corner and work your way to the top, then get the two that are at the top. Again, this part sucks.
  • Remove the control panel:
    • Looking at the bottom of the toaster oven and about an inch in, there is a hole cut in the bottom and a single screw pointing "up" toward the top of the toaster oven. Remove it.
    • Unplug the 9-wire red-and-white cable.
    • Unplug the white nylon 2-wire cable.
    • The Control PCB should now be free.
  • Remove the PCB from the assembly:
    • Remove the metal piece that's over the white plastic. 2 screws.
    • Remove the screws in the white plastic and take off the white plastic
    • Remove the single screw holding the PCB down and take it off.
  • Fix the PCB! Yay!
    • The busted switch will be labeled on the "yellow" side as K101 and will be in between two LEDs. Remove the switch using a soldering iron.
    • The °C/°F switch will be labeled on the "yellow" side as K103. Remove it with a soldering iron. Don't mix the two up!
    • The switches all go in the same way, the feet come out the left and right sides.
    • Solder the switches back in place but swapping the K101 switch with the K103 switch.
  • Put everything back together. Just do it all in reverse.
    • When putting the white plastic piece back on the back of the PCB assembly, hook the long rubber strip on it first. Then put the bent metal piece on and into the slot on the rubber strip.
    • Note that the three knobs on the front control panel are keyed and must fit into their respective PCB-mounted sensors in a particular orientation. If not, the PCB will jut out a little bit depth-wise and result in an incorrect fit during reassembly. (Thanks, Vladimir Kutz)

Good luck and god speed!

Pictures of the PCB with K101 already removed. Placement of the 5 black screws holding the front control panel to the top case. Picture of the bottom screw holding the front control panel to the top case.

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Great instructions! I've gotten it apart but am seriously wondering how in the world I am going to get those top screws backs in because they were such a bear to get out. Did you really get yours back together? Any hints on those 5 screws?

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I did get them back in but it wasn't fun. I had to flex the outer case quite a bit just to fit my hand in there. Use a long screw driver and skinny hands!

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And is your oven working correctly now? I took the circuit board to a shop since I’m not a solderer and they said the switch did not seem bad and started talking about switch leakage in a circuit and that I would not be changing anything by swapping switches. My eyes glazed over and I left - just wondering if I should try another shop or give up.

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Hi Kathy, I have this problem too, but I haven't had the time to address it yet. The instructions Chris provided are phenomenal. I just wanted to let you know that I'm also "not a solderer", but it can be done by a novice. Youtube is loaded with "how-to" videos. It's a little scary at first, but you can do it too! You don't need a blow torch, but a small, pen-like tool that has a pointy tip that heats up like an iron. You just touch the hot tip on the silver solder material and it simply melts it away, so you can removed the part. Once the part is removed, you just add new solder by melting the solder material over the part you need to attach to the circuit board. Amazon has kits available with the solder material and the iron for less than $20. You just have to look up "solder kit". Good luck.

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It is working correctly now. The switches have two feet on the left and two feet on the right. The top feet are interconnected and the bottom feet are interconnected. When you press the button, it connects both top feet to both bottom feet. One of the feet on the switch _is_ connected to the same circuit as the convection button.

My best guess is one of the legs _inside_ the switch is broken and only allowing 3 of them to connect. Since one of the legs is connected to the convection circuit, I think this is causing it to think that the convection button is being triggered instead of the Start button.

Kate is correct. This is a very simple and basic job as far as soldering goes. You'd want to put something like a small screwdriver under the switch on the front of the board and melt the solder on the back of the board. If you keep pressure and keep moving the soldering iron from foot to foot it should be enough to eventually get it to wiggle out of the board. I think a 40 watt soldering iron should be good.

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So after a month or so, the original problem returned and continues to happen intermittently. I only swapped the switches so am now considering trying to replace it and change the position of that spring while I’m at it. Was wondering if Dustin Rhoades had success with the switches he ordered? Or if anyone else can tell me what switch to buy?

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I ordered 2 kinds of micro switches. I do have them but I haven't tried the repair yet. I have about 50 of each kind. I can mail you out a couple of each. Send me an email, my gmail is my username here.

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Sorry but not sure I understand your email - is it dustinrhoades@gmail - one word?

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no, it's my @ username, my2k2zx2.

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How can I get 2 micro switches ? have same problem .chwaldner@ gmail.com

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Maybe I don't fully understand the "black screw" problem. When I reassembled mine I reattached the control panel assembly to the housing with all the screws, put the housing in place, pulled the control panel side of the housing out slightly and I was able to easily reach in and connect the two connectors to the board. Seems to me it would have been just as easy to do this in reverse. If I needed to do this again I would do everything the same up to the "remove the back" step in Chris Helming’s instructions, then, from here, instead of fighting with the black screws, I would:

1) Remove the one screw from the bottom of the toaster pointing up, and which holds the bottom of the control panel to the toaster chassis.

2) Detach the outer housing from the toaster chassis by gently (but firmly as it takes some force) pulling the outer housing of the toaster (plus the control panel which is attached to it) backwards, but only until it disengages from the chassis - the control panel is still connected to the toaster via ribbon and power cables!

3) You should now be able to pull the control panel side of the housing outward and be able to reach in to disconnect the two connectors which go from the control panel to the board on the toaster.

4) With the connectors disconnected, the housing + control panel can be easily removed from the rest of the toaster.

5) Now, with the housing off the toaster, you can then easily access and remove all the black screws which attach the control panel to the housing, disassemble the control panel, work on the board, etc, then reassemble in reverse order.

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