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1.83 GHz Core Duo or 1.83, 2, or 2.16 GHz Core 2 Duo A1208 (EMC 2104/2110/2114/2124)

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Late 2006 iMac Blinking (white) power indicator, no boot

I have a late 2006 iMac with a power light that blinks and will not boot up.

I had disassembled it to check the camera connections and get the part number off the camera board. Prior putting the front bezel back on I powered it up to ensure it worked.

It did not work. The only other thing I did was to remove and reinstall the memory cards, same memory installed.

Any help would be appreciated.

Respondido! View the answer Também tenho esse problema

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My iMac has the exactly the same problem. I took out the memory card and placed it back in, (did nothing) I held the power button whilest pulling the wire in and out, the hard drive and the fan for some reason when over speed (honestly it scared me.)

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5 Soluções

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The blinking light usually means that it has a RAM problem. Try reseating your RAM one stick at a time.

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Thanks for the help it was unseated ram.

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You're welcome.

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Thanks alot!

searched "flashing led imac", found this thread, RAM-problem solved!

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The RAM answer solved the problem for me too. Saved me the cost of a new machine. Thanks.

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Power On Self Test (POST)

Intel-based Macintosh computers such as the iMac (20-inch Late 2006) rely on a combination of tones and blinking LEDs to display Power On Self Test (POST) error codes.

If the computer detects out-of-specification memory or no RAM installed, the screen will be black and the power LED on the front of the computer will blink once a second to indicate bad or no RAM. Bad RAM can include physically damaged, the incorrect type, or not present.

If the RAM is good enough to pass the POST test but it is marginal and cannot be used by the operating system, the computer will show a gray screen, three tones will sound and the power LED on the front of the computer will blink three times, pause, and repeat until the computer is turned off. The solution to both these situations is to install known good memory.

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say the thread here...mine just did this and I re-seated the RAM but it's still a flashing white light. any idea on another potential fix before I take it to the Apple store? it's my second computer but it's been a trooper for years.

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i believe your ram is in need of being reseated,

pull out the ram, push it in as far as you can, then close the side holders,

hope this helps

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Paul, this question is 4.5 years old. My answer was accepted as being the RAM. Why did you feel the need to put this answer up? Did you even read the above answers?

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I think it is the ram. Open up the ram bezel, remove the ram by pushing both metal ram locks up and towards each other and remove the ram. Lightly apply some wd-40 on both ram slots and on the gold puns on the ram cards, then reinsert the ram.

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@sherrytech - Sherry - Please take the time to read all of the thread here. As you can see one of the answers is marked in Green this is the accepted answer by the original poster of the question. The other fact here this is a very old question (2010 - six years ago!) so I'm sure the person had long since moved on.

The other point here is we don't want people posting answers that support another answer already posted. So in this case it would have been better to add in a comment like this one under the answer that you support and to give the poster of that answer an up tick (Yes/No) buttons. That way the best answer is listed first. In some cases the accepted answer may not be the best one! That is how the better one is made visible.

If you don't agree with an answer thats cool! But back your answer with hard data. There are times I've been wrong or had old information which was not correct any more. Then it makes sense to add in a new answer to offer newer info.

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OK, last issue here using lube sprays like WD40

That is not a very good idea! Oil on electronics collects dirt and dust overtime which causes the system to over heat! Clean and dry is what is needed here.

Yes, there are times a lube is needed like in a fan motor but how you lube it is also important! No sprays! You use a cotton swab which is wetted with the lube and then wiped onto the part, or you use a watchmakers needle (a small bent paper clip will do) to the dab the axle point and let the lube seep in.

Lastly, remember a small amount goes a long way here.

As for RAM slots a oilless cleaner is all I use no oil at all!

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Hi, I have a computer in parts right now, it stopped working and had a broken connected, a "fox conn cable that runs to the internal hard drive which has been removed.. Now it has to cables for the internal one broke and the other I removed.

While tearing apart my ps,3"" power surge blew it out, infinite blinking light off death..?? I noticed the battery was a 3volt same as the Panasonic inside the Mac, ps3 is newer

So I figured would fit and work tried to install after looking and comparing, just won't sit where it should. Decided to leave original in so placed it back now it won't stay on... Keeps falling out. Tried tape and still won't stay firm. CPU now has blinking light after slow start and then speeds up. Could be due to aftermarket fan speed app...

Help?

Tried keyboard resets..

Any other answers?

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