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Introdução

After long use of a keyboard, there will come a time when certain keys stop working. This can be difficult, especially if the key that has stopped working is a necessary key, like a letter. This guide shows you how to replace a broken Romer G Switch in a Logitech G Pro keyboard so you can continue using your keyboard without having to replace the entire unit. After you’ve finished this repair, you will be able to fix your keyboard in the future if more keys stop working.

  1. Make sure that your keyboard is unplugged from your computer before continuing this guide. Use your fingers to remove the keycaps of the keys that are no longer working. Use your fingers to remove the keycaps of the keys that are no longer working.
    • Make sure that your keyboard is unplugged from your computer before continuing this guide.

    • Use your fingers to remove the keycaps of the keys that are no longer working.

  2. Flip the keyboard and lay it face down. Remove the Logitech sticker and all of the rubber feet by peeling them away slowly. This allows the screws holes to be shown. Remove the Logitech sticker and all of the rubber feet by peeling them away slowly. This allows the screws holes to be shown.
    • Flip the keyboard and lay it face down.

    • Remove the Logitech sticker and all of the rubber feet by peeling them away slowly. This allows the screws holes to be shown.

  3. Flip up each of the stands to show two more screws. Remove the five 12.7 mm screws across the top using a Phillips #1 screwdriver. Remove the three 7.6 mm screws from the bottom using a Phillips #1 screwdriver.
    • Flip up each of the stands to show two more screws.

    • Remove the five 12.7 mm screws across the top using a Phillips #1 screwdriver.

    • Remove the three 7.6 mm screws from the bottom using a Phillips #1 screwdriver.

  4. Take your opening or prying tool and press down in the crease between the top and bottom plate and pull gently on the feet of the keyboard to separate the case. Do this on the left and right side so the back of the case separates evenly. Do this on the left and right side so the back of the case separates evenly.
    • Take your opening or prying tool and press down in the crease between the top and bottom plate and pull gently on the feet of the keyboard to separate the case.

    • Do this on the left and right side so the back of the case separates evenly.

  5. Remove the four 6.4 mm screws using a Phillips #1 screwdriver. Remove the four 3.8 mm screws using a Phillips #1 screwdriver to separate the board from the top case.
    • Remove the four 6.4 mm screws using a Phillips #1 screwdriver.

    • Remove the four 3.8 mm screws using a Phillips #1 screwdriver to separate the board from the top case.

  6. Gently press on the black casing around the board to let the top casing fall away from the board. Lift the board out of the top casing and place the top of the case to the side. Lift the board out of the top casing and place the top of the case to the side.
    • Gently press on the black casing around the board to let the top casing fall away from the board.

    • Lift the board out of the top casing and place the top of the case to the side.

  7. Flip the keyboard over so that you are looking at the keys. To locate the solder joint on the board, count the number of rows down and keys from the right or left side to the broken key/switch.
    • Flip the keyboard over so that you are looking at the keys.

    • To locate the solder joint on the board, count the number of rows down and keys from the right or left side to the broken key/switch.

    • Flip the keyboard over so you can see the solder joints again.

    • Using the number of rows and keys from the left and right, count the solder joints which will find the solder joint you need to remove.

    • It is helpful to count from the side that has fewer keys until the broken switch—in this case from right to left (the second row and five keys to the left).

  8. Heat your soldering iron up to 350 degrees celsius. Caution: Remember that soldering irons get to hundreds of degrees and you should be careful to not accidentally touch your skin with it as it can cause moderate to severe burns if left long enough.
    • Heat your soldering iron up to 350 degrees celsius.

    • Caution: Remember that soldering irons get to hundreds of degrees and you should be careful to not accidentally touch your skin with it as it can cause moderate to severe burns if left long enough.

    • The two pins you need to desolder will be diagonal of each other.

    • At this point, you want to desolder both pins holding the switch. As the solder is being melted you want to use your desoldering pump to remove the solder that has been melted.

  9. Flip the keyboard back over to see the keys. Using your switch puller tool, grab the switch on its left and right side and pull straight up from the board. Using your switch puller tool, grab the switch on its left and right side and pull straight up from the board.
    • Flip the keyboard back over to see the keys.

    • Using your switch puller tool, grab the switch on its left and right side and pull straight up from the board.

  10. Align the pins on the bottom of the replacement switch with the holes on the board where you took out the broken switch. Place it in and push firmly until you hear a click meaning it went all the way in.
    • Align the pins on the bottom of the replacement switch with the holes on the board where you took out the broken switch.

    • Place it in and push firmly until you hear a click meaning it went all the way in.

  11. If you unplugged or turned off your soldering iron, heat it back up to 350 degrees Celsius to solder the replacement Romer G Switch. Take the keyboard and flip it over so you can see the side with all the solder joints. Caution: Remember that soldering irons get to hundreds of degrees and you should be careful to not accidentally touch your skin with it as it can cause moderate to severe burns if left long enough.
    • If you unplugged or turned off your soldering iron, heat it back up to 350 degrees Celsius to solder the replacement Romer G Switch.

    • Take the keyboard and flip it over so you can see the side with all the solder joints.

    • Caution: Remember that soldering irons get to hundreds of degrees and you should be careful to not accidentally touch your skin with it as it can cause moderate to severe burns if left long enough.

    • After locating the new switch on the back of the board, press the soldering iron up against the pin, and push solder into the location of the iron slowly to create your solder joint. Do this for both pins.

  12. Place the front casing of the keyboard flat down. Take the board with the keys attached and line the board up, placing it back inside the front casing. Place the front casing of the keyboard flat down. Take the board with the keys attached and line the board up, placing it back inside the front casing. Place the front casing of the keyboard flat down. Take the board with the keys attached and line the board up, placing it back inside the front casing.
    • Place the front casing of the keyboard flat down. Take the board with the keys attached and line the board up, placing it back inside the front casing.

  13. Screw the four 6.4mm screws back in using a Phillips #1 screwdriver. Screw the four 3.8mm screws back in using a Phillips #1 screwdriver.
    • Screw the four 6.4mm screws back in using a Phillips #1 screwdriver.

    • Screw the four 3.8mm screws back in using a Phillips #1 screwdriver.

    • This attaches the front casing and board back together.

  14. Take the back casing and place it over the back and press firmly along the edges until it all clicks into place. Replace the five 12.7 mm screws with a Phillips #1 screwdriver. Replace the three 7.6 mm screws with a Phillips #1 screwdriver to reattach the bottom case to the top.
    • Take the back casing and place it over the back and press firmly along the edges until it all clicks into place.

    • Replace the five 12.7 mm screws with a Phillips #1 screwdriver.

    • Replace the three 7.6 mm screws with a Phillips #1 screwdriver to reattach the bottom case to the top.

  15. Apply some adhesive to each location where there was a rubber pad on the bottom of the keyboard. Then place each of the rubber feet back on top of the adhesive. Take the Logitech branding sticker and reapply it back to its location. The Logitech sticker does not need adhesive as it should retain its original adhesive and can just be reapplied.
    • Apply some adhesive to each location where there was a rubber pad on the bottom of the keyboard. Then place each of the rubber feet back on top of the adhesive.

    • Take the Logitech branding sticker and reapply it back to its location.

    • The Logitech sticker does not need adhesive as it should retain its original adhesive and can just be reapplied.

  16. Flip the keyboard over so you are looking at the keys. Take the keycaps of the switches being replaced, and line up the lettering so that it matches and push the keycap back down firmly into its original location. Take the keycaps of the switches being replaced, and line up the lettering so that it matches and push the keycap back down firmly into its original location.
    • Flip the keyboard over so you are looking at the keys.

    • Take the keycaps of the switches being replaced, and line up the lettering so that it matches and push the keycap back down firmly into its original location.

Conclusão

Congratulations, you have now learned how to disassemble and reassemble a Logitech G Pro Keyboard as well as replace Romer G Switches in this keyboard.

Uma outra pessoa concluiu este guia.

Andrew Raposo

Membro desde: 22/03/2021

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