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Versão atual de: Minho ,

Texto:

Certainly, charging issues are related to the Tristar IC (U4500) and certain non-booting issues as well. However, rather than just replacing IC's for no apparent reason, I would suggest you do some troubleshooting first. Every time you start removing IC's, you always run the risk of doing some collateral damage.
 
Check some of your main power rails first, like PP_VCC_MAIN, PP_BATT_VCC & PP5V0_USB (when plugged in). Then check the PMIC and the dozen or so power rails it generates. If you find shorts, then look for bad components. Check the backlight driver (U4020) and related circuitry.
 
The problem with water damage is that there could be multiple problems to resolve. You could get lucky and solve it all with a Tristar replacement. But if you are going to do more of these types of repairs; and being able to remove shields shows you have tools and skills, then spend some time looking at the circuit (the iPhone 6S schematic is available in the wild) to understand what is going on.
 
It'll be fun!
 
EDIT
 
Here is a snapshot of the Tigris Chip (U2300). It is responsible for generating PP_VCC_MAIN. By default, the battery (PP_BATT_VCC) supplies this; note the pull down resistor on Q2300this. If the Lightning port is connected, then Q2300 is "opens" and PP5V0_USB is used to generate PP_VCC_MAIN via the built-in Buck converter.
Here is a snapshot of the Tigris Chip (U2300). It is responsible for generating PP_VCC_MAIN. By default, the battery (PP_BATT_VCC) supplies this; note the pull down resistor on Q2300this. If the Lightning port is connected, then Q2300 is "opens" and PP5V0_USB is used to generate PP_VCC_MAIN via the built-in Buck converter.
 
Assuming those rails are okay, then look at Tristar. The problem with Tristar is that there is no easy way to see if it's working unless you use a scope. Maybe @cyberzero has some ideas here. I'd love to hear them.
 
Otherwise, you need to start looking at the PMIC voltages. Rey's trick will help you do it "blind". Once (or if) you find something, the look at the PMIC (U2000) .
Otherwise, you need to start looking at the PMIC voltages. Rey's trick will help you do it "blind". Once (or if) you find something, the look at the PMIC (U2000) .
 
[image|986067]
 
[image|986068]

Status:

open

Editado por: Minho ,

Texto:

Certainly, charging issues are related to the Tristar IC (U4500) and certain non-booting issues as well. However, rather than just replacing IC's for no apparent reason, I would suggest you do some troubleshooting first. Every time you start removing IC's, you always run the risk of doing some collateral damage.
 
Check some of your main power rails first, like PP_VCC_MAIN, PP_BATT_VCC & PP5V0_USB (when plugged in). Then check the PMIC and the dozen or so power rails it generates. If you find shorts, then look for bad components. Check the backlight driver (U4020) and related circuitry.
 
The problem with water damage is that there could be multiple problems to resolve. You could get lucky and solve it all with a Tristar replacement. But if you are going to do more of these types of repairs; and being able to remove shields shows you have tools and skills, then spend some time looking at the circuit (the iPhone 6S schematic is available in the wild) to understand what is going on.
The problem with water damage is that there could be multiple problems to resolve. You could get lucky and solve it all with a Tristar replacement. But if you are going to do more of these types of repairs; and being able to remove shields shows you have tools and skills, then spend some time looking at the circuit (the iPhone 6S schematic is available in the wild) to understand what is going on.
 
It'll be fun!
 
EDIT
 
Here is a snapshot of the Tigris Chip (U2300). It is responsible for generating PP_VCC_MAIN. By default, the battery (PP_BATT_VCC) supplies this; note the pull down resistor on Q2300. If the Lightning port is connected, then Q2300 is "opens" and PP5V0_USB is used to generate PP_VCC_MAIN via the built-in Buck converter.
 
Assuming those rails are okay, then look at Tristar. The problem with Tristar is that there is no easy way to see if it's working unless you use a scope. Maybe @cyberzero has some ideas here. I'd love to hear them.
 
Otherwise, you need to start looking at the PMIC voltages. Rey's trick will help you do it "blind". Once (or if) you find something, the look at the PMIC (U2000) .
 
[image|986067]
[image|986068]

Status:

open

Editado por: Minho ,

Texto:

Certainly, charging issues are related to the Tristar IC (U4500) and certain non-booting issues as well. However, rather than just replacing IC's for no apparent reason, I would suggest you do some troubleshooting first. Every time you start removing IC's, you always run the risk of doing some collateral damage.
 
Check some of your main power rails first, like PP_VCC_MAIN, PP_BATT_VCC & PP5V0_USB (when plugged in). Then check the PMIC and the dozen or so power rails it generates. If you find shorts, then look for bad components. Check the backlight driver (U4020) and related circuitry.
 
The problem with water damage is that there could be multiple problems to resolve. You could get lucky and solve it all with a Tristar replacement. But if you are going to do more of these types of repairs; and being able to remove shields shows you have tools and skills, then spend some time looking at the circuit (the iPhone 6S schematic is available in the wild) to understand what is going on.

It'll be fun!
The problem with water damage is that there could be multiple problems to resolve. You could get lucky and solve it all with a Tristar replacement. But if you are going to do more of these types of repairs; and being able to remove shields shows you have tools and skills, then spend some time looking at the circuit (the iPhone 6S schematic is available in the wild) to understand what is going on.

It'll be fun!

Status:

open

Postagem original de: Minho ,

Texto:

Certainly, charging issues are related to the Tristar IC (U4500) and certain non-booting issues as well. However, rather than just replacing IC's for no apparent reason, I would suggest you do some troubleshooting first. Every time you start removing IC's, you always run the risk of doing some collateral damage.

Check some of your main power rails first, like PP_VCC_MAIN, PP_BATT_VCC & PP5V0_USB (when plugged in). Then check the PMIC and the dozen or so power rails it generates. If you find shorts, then look for bad components. Check the backlight driver (U4020) and related circuitry.

The problem with water damage is that there could be multiple problems to resolve. You could get lucky and solve it all with a Tristar replacement. But if you are going to do more of these types of repairs; and being able to remove shields shows you have tools and skills, then spend some time looking at the circuit (the iPhone 6S schematic is available in the wild) to understand what is going on.

Status:

open