Pular para o conteúdo principal
Ajuda

Versão atual de: rdklinc ,

Texto:

I know this doesn't help, or really answer the question, but my attitude towards batteries and computers in general is that they exist for our purposes and for our convenience, so to take up our own time in order to make a battery happy and meet its needs is fairly self-defeating. Besides, it's very difficult if not impossible to ever know ifwhether or not how you've cared for or not cared for a battery led to it living an extra 90 days, or dying 90 days earlier. I say, just forget about the battery! :-) Anyway, just my two cents.
I know this doesn't help, or really answer the question, but my attitude towards batteries and computers in general is that they exist for our purposes and for our convenience, so to take up our own time in order to make a battery happy and meet its needs is fairly self-defeating. Besides, it's very difficult if not impossible to ever know ifwhether or not how you've cared for or not cared for a battery led to it living an extra 90 days, or dying 90 days earlier. I say, just forget about the battery! :-) Anyway, just my two cents.
 
In the 80s/90s when we had inferior NIMH and other battery types which had a "memory" and absolutely needed to be fully charged/discharged, behavior toward a battery was much more relevant. But now that we have lithium ions which are far less temperamental, again, it's near impossible to tell if your behavior is affecting battery life, yet opinions on how to treat batteries still persist.

Status:

open

Editado por: rdklinc ,

Texto:

I know this doesn't help, or really answer the question, but my attitude towards batteries and computers in general is that they exist for our purposes and for our convenience, so to take up our own time in order to make a battery happy and meet its needs is fairly self-defeating. Besides, it's very difficult if not impossible to ever know if how you've cared for or not cared for a battery led to it living an extra 90 days, or dying 90 days earlier. I say, just forget about the battery! :-) Anyway, just my two cents.
 
In the days of80s/90s when we had inferior NIMH batteries and other battery types of batteries in the 80s/90s which had a "memory" and absolutely needed to be fully charged/discharged, behavior toward a battery was much more relevant, butrelevant. But now that we have lithium ions which are far less termeramentaltemperamental, again, it's near impossible to tell if your behavior is affecting battery lifelife, yet opinions on how to treat batteries still persist.
In the days of80s/90s when we had inferior NIMH batteries and other battery types of batteries in the 80s/90s which had a "memory" and absolutely needed to be fully charged/discharged, behavior toward a battery was much more relevant, butrelevant. But now that we have lithium ions which are far less termeramentaltemperamental, again, it's near impossible to tell if your behavior is affecting battery lifelife, yet opinions on how to treat batteries still persist.

Status:

open

Editado por: rdklinc ,

Texto:

I know this doesn't help, or really answer the question, but my attitude towards batteries and computers in general is that they exist for our purposes and for our convenience, so to take up our own time in order to make a battery happy and meet its needs is fairly self-defeating. Besides, it's very difficult if not impossible to ever know if how you've cared for or not cared for a battery led to it living an extra 90 days, or dying 90 days earlier. I say, just forget about the battery! :-) Anyway, just my two cents.
 
In the days of inferior NIMH batteries and other types of batteries in the 80s/90s which had a "memory" and needed to be fully charged/discharged, behavior toward a battery was much more relevant, but now that we have lithium ions which are far less termeramental, again, it's near impossible to tell if your behavior is affecting battery life.

Status:

open

Postagem original de: rdklinc ,

Texto:

I know this doesn't help, or really answer the question, but my attitude towards batteries and computers in general is that they exist for our purposes and for our convenience, so to take up our own time in order to make a battery happy and meet its needs is fairly self-defeating.  Besides, it's very difficult if not impossible to ever know if how you've cared for or not cared for a battery led to it living an extra 90 days, or dying 90 days earlier.  I say, just forget about the battery!  :-)  Anyway, just my two cents.

Status:

open